In Daniel Moerman’s Native American Ethnobotany, he describes many of the medicinal uses of the cattail. A long time ago, people noticed that using the fluff inside of layers of linen makes for a great insulator. They also provide a tremendous source of protein and carbohydrates when eaten. Traditionally, scientists captured, tagged and released individual birds and hoped that someone, somewhere, would find this bird and report its whereabouts. Insulation & Absorption Alas, though, the war ended before the concept was proven or implemented. The seed heads … Achillea millefolium Yarrow or milfoil is a leading backyard medicine plant. Cattail rhizomes are fairly high in starch content; this is usually listed at about 30% to 46%. If you are in doubt if the plant is a Cattail or a Calamus just bruise the leaf. You can also cook the pollen in the same manner you’d cook corn on the cob and use it in a dressing to stop bleeding. Most recently, scientists have claimed the potential for cattails to be used as biofuel. Cattail, (genus Typha), genus of about 30 species of tall reedy marsh plants (family Typhaceae), found mainly in temperate and cold regions of the Northern and Southern hemispheres. Cattails propagate both through their seeds—widely dispersed by the wind and birds—and through the extensive network of roots just below the mud’s surface. Native Americans routinely harvested the cattail plant for use as tinder, diaper material, and, yes, food. This honey-looking product has strong antiseptic properties, which made cattail an indispensable part of the first aid kit on the American frontier for centuries. A small drop of a honey-like excretion, often found near the base of the plant, can be used as an antiseptic for small wounds and toothaches. ​Hopefully, you’ve learned a few things – maybe even a few useful things – about the cattail plant and how it can help you in a survival or emergency situation while you're out hunting or fishing. Medicinally, cattail’s prime use is external. Ways we’ve mostly forgotten today. The ash of the burned cattail leaves can be used as an antiseptic or styptic for … TCM uses cattail pollen mixed with honey as a poultice for wounds. Key TCM Actions & Medicinal Uses: Cattail Pollen (Pu Huang): Stops Bleeding/Removes Stasis: bloody noses, traumatic bleeding, abdominal pain, menstrual cramps, postpartum bleeding, uterine bleeding, vomiting blood and blood in the urine. The leaves and berri es were combined in tea to reduce fever or made into a poultice to soothe poison ivy. The root can be poulticed and used on cuts, wounds, scrapes, burns, stings, and bruises, as well as scabs, inflammations, and smallpox pustules. The roots should be cooked before eating. These pollutants stay in the plant. If you’re like me, you’ve never really given the cattail on the edge of your favorite lake or pond much thought. The medicinal uses of cattails include poultices made from the split and bruised roots that can be applied to cuts,wounds,burns,stings,and bruises. As previously mentioned, the cattail seed fluff can be used for stuffing and insulation. The fluffy wool is similar to d… This nutrient helps to prevent the secretion of testosterone which … Uses and Parts Used: Root: Pounded roots used as a poultice for burns and sores. It should not be prescribed for pregnant women[238]. The brown seed down of the cattail can be used to treat diaper rash or provide padding for a splint. Pretty awesome. The plants inhabit fresh to slightly brackish waters and are considered aquatic or semi-aquatic. Anticoagulant Diuretic Emmenagogue Haemostatic Lithontripic Miscellany The pollen is diuretic, emmenagogue and haemostatic[176]. There are even health and medicine applications for cattails. American Indians used it quite extensively. But it has a lot of benefits both to the environment, and to us as lovers of the outdoors. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally. This is one of the most famous survival plants the indigenous population used for … These plants have uses far beyond just being edible. Learning wild plants used for medicine, food, and tools is also known as the study of ethnobotany (how people utilize plants). please check out our Cattail PDF magazine. I… (Broadcast: "Field Notes" 04/01/18 & 04/06/18 Listen on air or online Sundays at 12:55 p.m., Tuesdays at 4:54 p.m., and Fridays at 4:54 p.m., or via podcast.). The seed down is haemostatic. Chinese researchers are investigating cattail pollen’s reputation for shrinking cancerous tumors. Yarrow flowers, leaves and stems can be used to make a medicinal tea. Producing more starch per acre than potatoes or rice, and not requiring any annual tillage (as a perennial plant), Cattail is uniquely positioned to make huge contributions to sustainable gardenin… The cattail roots have rhizomes. nutrition, medicinal values, recipes, history, harvesting tips, etc.) Like many other wetland plants, cattails bio-accumulate toxins. Aboriginals used the roots to make flour (high in protein and carbohydrates) and the fluffy wool of the head was used as diapers because of its softness and absorbency. The legendary Japanese sword Kusanagi got its name from the Calamus. Cattails can be used in recipes for pancakes and bread, casseroles, and stir fry. The squirrel was attacking me! Cattails have also been successfully used in cleaning up a range of toxins that have leached into waterways, such as arsenic, pharmaceuticals, explosives, phosphorous, and methane. Turmeric ( Haldi in India ) contains Vitamin B6. Cattail, (genus Typha), genus of about 30 species of tall reedy marsh plants (family Typhaceae), found mainly in temperate and cold regions of the Northern and Southern hemispheres. This is the part of the plant that produces all the starch (carbohydrate) that almost made it famous. There’s no doubt the plant can be a nuisance. Learn more about Yarrow uses, effectiveness, possible side effects, interactions, dosage, user ratings and products that contain Yarrow Cattails are found throughout North America and most of the world. The ash from burned leaves can also be incorporated into a medicinal … It needs to be boiled for 10-12 minutes before eating. Painted turtles, often seen sunning themselves on logs in Bancroft Pond during the summer, eat the cattails’ seeds and stems. The pollen spike at the top is packed with protein. The different uses for cattails (Typha … List of various diseases cured by Cat Tail Plant. You can also use it as kindling to start a fire. Place directly on cut to control bleeding. First of all, please understand I’m taking some license with word emergency here. According to the National Academy of Sciences, interest in aquaculture and the need for more biodiversity and sustainability as well as less waste in our food supply has revived interest in harvesting cattail for our consumption.​. This poultice acts as an antiseptic and can be used to relieve pain and inflammation in cuts, wounds, burns, stings and bruises. There are few things more evocative of wildness in the northern woods than the hooting of great horned owls. Common Cattails. The seeds of the mature plant can be used in the same manners, while young flowers of the plant can be eaten to stop diarrhea. Cattails are also a culinary delicacy and all parts of the plant can be eaten. The young leafing shoots (2’ or under) are collected and used as a potherb, or cooked and added to soups, etc. The cattail is one of the most important and most common wild foods that also boast a variety of uses at different times of the year. The bark of any tree is more than just a good-looking facade. The ash of the burned cattail leaves can be used as an antiseptic or styptic for wounds. Related: How Cherokees Used Trees of Southern Appalachia for Food, Medicine, and Craft #8. I looked up and saw two more falling. Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Humans have taken their cue from the animals over the centuries and continue to benefit from cattail’s nutritional, medicinal, and material uses. Once the season has passed and the pollen is gone, the brown heads make good “punks,” supporting a slowly-burning flame, with a smoke that drives insects away. Medicinal use of Southern Cattail: The leaves are diuretic. Cattail leaf margins are never red or wavy. Medicinal Uses Cattails are truly a survival plant in the truest sense of the word. Cattail Rhizomes – (underground stems) and lower stems have a sweet flavor and can be eaten raw, baked, roasted, or broiled. Seed fluff can also be used like cotton balls to staunch a wound, and poultices made from crushed cattail roots can be used on cuts, stings, burns, and bruises. -, Native Americans were already using it in all sorts of ways; including medicinally, According to the National Academy of Sciences, https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF02910407, http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/10.1139/b81-287#.WVrsUoQrK00, https://academic.oup.com/humupd/article/13/5/487/658720/Evolution-of-medical-treatment-for-endometriosis, http://www.pnas.org/content/96/11/5995.short. Names of Cat Tail Plant in various languages of the world are also given. Migration is one of the many adaptations used by birds and other animals to cope with the cold temperatures and scarcity of food that winter can bring. Then it headed up the tree and disappeared among the high branches. And if you need to start a fire to cook food or keep warm, cattails are a fine substitute for wood when starting a fire. Urban gardeners frequently plant cattails in small ponds as a barrier between the exhaust fumes from roadways and fruit trees or vegetable plots. Seed down: Fuzz from flowers also used to treat burns and sores and to prevent chafing in babies. The sweet fiber in cattail roots provides an abundance of starchy carbohydrates; the new stalk shoots can be eaten to obtain Vitamins A, B, and C, potassium, and phosphorous; and the seeds can be ground and used as a flour substitute. One acre of cattails would yield about 6,475 pounds of flour (Harrington 1972). How Cat Tail Plant is effective for various diseases is listed in repertory format. The flowers are found on a long spike. Everyday Yarrow Uses for Natural Healing Yarrow is historically known for its medicinal properties. Cattail Rhizomes – (underground stems) and lower stems have a sweet flavor and can be eaten raw, baked, roasted, or broiled. Cat-o-nine-tails, reedmace, bulrush, water torch, candlewick, punk, and corn dog grass. One fall day, on a visit to Bancroft Pond, Missoula’s urban wetland wedged between Bancroft and 34th St., my eight-year-old daughter and her friend collected grocery bags filled with cattail fluff. Cattail pollen capsules, known as Pu Huang, are a popular remedy for nosebleeds, uterine bleeding and blood in the urine. Cattail Core – can be ground into flour. Cattail Flower Bread; Other Uses for Cattails. A cattail's yellow pollen can be used either externally or internally. It is used internally in the treatment of kidney stones, haemorrhage, painful menstruation, abnormal uterine bleeding, post-partum pains, abscesses and cancer of the lymphatic system[222, 238]. Cattails, aka Bulrushes, have many non-food uses. Mash up the roots to make a poultice, and use it to treat burns, scrapes, sores, cuts, bruises, and even acne. With the scientific name Typha, this unassuming species of flowering plants may be overlooked by most people, and might also be known by many names, including bulrush, reedmace, raupo, or corn dog grass, but almost every variant of the species shares similar physical properties, and medicinal uses. If you dip the head in fat or oil, they can be used as torches. Cattail pollen capsules, known as Pu Huang, are a popular remedy for nosebleeds, uterine bleeding and blood in the urine. Painted Puzzle Pieces: How Ponderosa Pine Bark Protects and Preserves, 'Field Notes:' How Scientists Study Bird Migration, 'Field Notes:' How Red Squirrels Store Food For The Winter. Used externally, the pollen has an anticoagulant effect if it is uncooked. www.canadianbushcraft.ca It helps to reduce the deposition of lipids on the walls of the arteries. ***Attention*** Plight to Freedom is now The Cargo Cult Café. If they have a strong odor, you shouldn’t eat them. A cattail's yellow pollen can be used either externally or internally. It provides cover and food for an amazing variety of animals, fish, and insects. I turned off the trail and headed into the woods in search of a comfortable place to nestle down and daydream. The ash of the burned cattail leaves can be used as an antiseptic or styptic for wounds. Cattail roots are very productive, and can produce more edible starch (flour) than potatoes, yams, rice or taro. These amazing plants can provide you with shelter, fire, food, and water (since they grow near water sources). Promotes Lactation. It jumped onto the trunk of a ponderosa pine and gave me that bright-eyed stare accompanied by several swishes of its feathery tail. TCM uses cattail pollen mixed with honey as a poultice for wounds. Finally, the ash from burned cattail leaves has an antiseptic and styptic (stops bleeding) quality. Pin Yin: Pu Huang (Cattail Pollen) Also Known As: N/A Meridians: Liver, Heart, Spleen Key TCM Actions & Medicinal Uses: Cattail Pollen (Pu Huang): Stops Bleeding/Removes Stasis: bloody noses, traumatic bleeding, abdominal pain, menstrual cramps, postpartum bleeding, uterine bleeding, vomiting blood and blood in the urine.Mixed with honey to heal wounds. Montana is home to the native broadleaf variety, as well as the introduced narrow leaf plants. The flowers develop into fluffy seeds. The cattail roots and stem can also be used to reduce fever, increase urine flow (diuretic), increase lactation, and treat dysentery. In some east Indian and Chinese cultures the roots of the Sweet Flag have many medicinal uses. Cattails also provide two forms of antiseptic; both the ashes from burned cattail leaves and the droplets of sap that form at the plant’s base can be applied to wounds to keep them from getting infected. Cattail’s biggest claim to ‘almost’ fame came toward the end of World War Two according to legend. Cattail Flower Bread; Other Uses for Cattails. If you choose to use cattail, make sure to. The ash of burned cattail leaves can be applied to wounds as an antiseptic and styptic. At Bancroft Pond the cattails most noticeably provide perches for a multitude of red-winged blackbirds that compete with the sounds of traffic to create with their unmistakable trills of “conk-la-ree!” Female red-winged blackbirds — less showy than their boasting male counterparts — hide at the base of the cattails, nesting and raising their young. Cattail has a multitude of medicinal uses as well. Dipping the head in oil or fat, they can be used as torches. String could also be made from fibers at the base of leaves. Several ecological and agronomical uses for this crop are being considered, for example using the crop for bioenergy, as it has an excellent heat value that is comparable to that of commercial wood (Grosshans, 2014). If they have a strong odor, you shouldn’t eat them. Medicine: Pollen is hemostatic & astringent. Medicinal Uses. In some East Indian and Chinese cultures, the roots of the Sweet Flag have many medicinal uses. Medicinal and other uses. is often nicknamed "The Supermarket of the Swamp", and for good reason! https://wildmedicines.blogspot.com/2012/11/cattail-typha.html When harvesting cattails for consumption, it is important to collect them from a clean source, away from roads and buildings. What other plant can boast eight food products, three medicinal’s, and at least 12 other functional uses? Cattails are truly a survival plant in the truest sense of the word. Insulation & Absorption. The dried stalks can be used as arrow shafts or hand drills, and the seed fluff can be used as tinder to start a fire. It should not be prescribed for pregnant women. Cattail’s wild home is in marshlands and wet meadows, alongside other native rushes, sedges, and wetland plants. USES FOR CATTAIL. Sometimes the margins on the Sweet Flag are red. Aside from many food products and medicines, Native Americans used cattails for a variety of types of weaving. The medicinal uses of cattails include poultices made from the split and bruised roots that can be applied to cuts, wounds, burns, stings, and bruises. And many songbirds, such as cedar waxwings, line their nests with cattail down. Mash up the roots to make a poultice, and use it to treat burns, scrapes, sores, cuts, bruises, and even acne. The ‘tenders,’ which are the root portion of new growth can be eaten uncooked, however. A decoction from sumac was used as a gargle to relieve sore throats or taken as a remedy for diarrhea. Cattails are truly a survival plant in the truest sense of the word. The pollen is astringent, desiccant, diuretic, haemostatic and vulnerary. Cattail comprises of a certain composition of compounds, which help in decreasing the lipids in the body and even dilating the coronary artery. Find out how you can use it — in all forms — for natural healing and first-aid treatment. Many farmers and outdoorsmen learned to use them in new and innovative ways. Other uses: Fluff is good tinder and insulation, leaves can be woven into baskets and used to thatch huts. This plant can be used for multiple medicinal remedies, but it is one of the only plants that the healers used in treating eye problems. Native American’s harvested cattails regularly and utilized them for various things. To treat burns, scrapes, insect bites and bruises, split open a cattail root and “bruise” the exposed portion so it can be used as a poultice that can be secured over the injured area. Cattail definition is - any of a genus (Typha of the family Typhaceae, the cattail family) of tall reedy marsh plants with brown furry fruiting spikes; especially : a plant (Typha latifolia) with long flat leaves used especially for making mats and chair seats. The pollen is astringent, desiccant, diuretic, haemostatic and vulnerary. See How Cattail Mats are Made See How Cattail Toys are Made See How Cordage is Made Learn about Reed Decoys. Medicinally, cattail’s prime use is external. A small drop of a honey-like excretion, often found near the base of the plant, can be used as an antiseptic for small wounds and toothaches. They remove harmful pollutants from the water. CATTAIL MATS AND BARK SHEETS COVERING A WIGWAM AT PLIMOTH PLANTATION, PLYMOUTH, MA. Take internally for internal bleeding, menstrual pain, chest pains, & other forms of blood stagnation. The ash from burned leaves can also be incorporated into a … You can use either the fresh or dried flower/leaves. Wash thoroughly before eating parts raw so as to avoid picking up any infectious, water-borne microbes. Traditional Medicinal Use. In a wet location, it is extremely low-maintenance and self-reliant, and makes a great soil stabilizer along streambanks. Bullrushes/cattails Close-up of cattail bases. Cattails, for all their various uses, are an invasive plant and are still often seen as an annoyance by property owners and wetlands conservationists. Cattail has several ways of keeping a person warm and not all of them include combustion. Other Uses. Cattails, for all their various uses, are an invasive plant and are still often seen as an annoyance by property owners and wetlands conservationists. Using edible parts of a cattail in the kitchen is nothing new, except maybe the kitchen part. Using the Cattail Fluff for Insulation. They not only provide, food, material for shelters and cordage cattails have medicinal uses as well. To treat burns, scrapes, insect bites and bruises split open a cattail root and “bruise” the exposed portion so it can be used as a poultice that can be secured over the injured area. Cattail Core – can be ground into flour. The fluff could also be used as a bandage in wound healing. They not only provide, food, material for shelters and cordage, cattails have several medicinal uses as well. It is used internally in the treatment of kidney stones, internal haemorrhage of almost any kind, painful menstruation, abnormal uterine bleeding, post-partum pains, abscesses and cancer of the lymphatic system [222, 238, 254]. The two girls filled hand-sewn pillows with the cattail down, unknowingly mimicking the indigenous use of the plant’s seeds in lining moccasins and papoose boards. If you pull up the cattail roots, split them and mash them a little bit, it will produce a poultice. It is used in the treatment of heart diseases like angina, hyperlipidemia. Given that cattail rhizome flour (T. angustifolia L.) is a medicinal plant used to treat inflammation and related disease and is an important source of dietary fibre and carbohydrates, the aim of the present study was to evaluate if dietary supplementation with cattail rhizome flour could act as a prebiotic and produce protective effects on the intestinal inflammatory process. It is used in the treatment of nose bleeds, haematemesis, haematuria, uterine bleeding, dysmenorrhoea, postpartum abdominal pain and gastralgia, scrofula and abscesses. It’s kind of an odd plant, really. The utility of this cattail is limited only by your imagination. Mixed with honey to heal wounds. For comprehensive information (e.g. Young flowers can be ingested for diarrhea. Chinese researchers are investigating cattail pollen’s reputation for shrinking cancerous tumors. It is used in the treatment of nose bleeds, haematemesis, haematuria, uterine bleeding, dysmenorrhoea, postpartum abdominal pain and gastralgia, scrofula and abscesses. The cattail is one of the most important and most common wild foods that also boast a variety of uses at different times of the year. But if you roast it over a slow fire until it's black, you can use it as a wound dressing to stop bleeding. An infusion of the root is used to treat cuts and various skin disorders. This advantage helps them to crowd out other important wetland plant species. ​Cattail hasn’t always been as prevalent in the United States and Canada as it is now. It is contraindicated for pregnant women. Moreover, it is even used to dissolve stasis. One acre of cattails would yield about 6,475 pounds of flour (Harrington 1972). Parts Used: herb Eat the flowering head to stop diarrhea. Cattail seed pods are ALWAYS at the top of the stem. It does a great job of reducing inflammation, and has a cooling effect on the skin. Cattail is a native food with edible roots, shoots, immature flower heads, pollen, and seed! Cattails are a utilitarian plant. In some east Indian and Chinese cultures the roots of the Sweet Flag have many medicinal uses. The cattail has almost as many names as it has uses. Cattail seed pods are ALWAYS at the top of the stem. Tenders should be soft and bland. The medicinal uses of cattails include poultices made from the split and bruised roots that can be applied to cuts, wounds, burns, stings, and bruises. Cattail rhizome and new shoot at its tip. The roots and stalks can be baked, boiled, fried, or, if harvested from a pristine area, eaten raw. It does a great job of reducing inflammation, and has a cooling effect on the skin. Common Cattail- Heads . Edible and medicinal plants can provide healthy alternatives to highly processed foods and pharmaceuticals, bringing greater health into our lives. The sap can also be used on toothaches. In China, cattail pollen are being used for medicinal tea (Geurts, personal communication, 2017). These amazing plants can provide you with shelter, fire, food, and water (since they grow near water sources). The cattail roots and stem can also be used to reduce fever, increase urine flow (diuretic), increase lactation, and treat dysentery. Cat Tail Plant ( Kuppi in India ) gently penetrates the skin which helps in thinning of hair. Uses, Benefits, Cures, Side Effects, Nutrients in Cat Tail Plant. Tenders should be soft and bland. ash from burned cattail leaves has an antiseptic and styptic (stops bleeding) quality, select plants that are in areas where the water is moving around them rather than stagnant. Roots are often dried and ground into flour, but can also be peeled and cooked as a root vegetable - although the taste is rather bland and fibrous. Its roots can be pounded into a poultice and used for sores and burns once applied topically. This has not changed and today, the same fluff can still be used in this way. Cattails have also been successfully used in cleaning up a range of toxins that have leached into waterways, such as arsenic, pharmaceuticals, explosives, phosphorous, and methane. They not only provide, food, material for shelters and cordage cattails have medicinal uses as well. Edible Uses. Cattail leaf margins are never red or wavy. Also, the “down” of the mature flower spikes has been used as a dressing for burns and wounds. Cattail leaf margins are never red or wavy. Just pull them up from the mud, remove several of the outer layers and eat them directly off the stem. Dangers: Fluff may cause skin irritation. Native American Bulrush (Cattail) Mythology Cattails, also known as bulrushes, had a number of practical uses in traditional Native American life: cattail heads and seeds were eaten, cattail leaves and stalks were used for weaving mats and baskets, cattail roots and pollen were used as medicine herbs, and cattail down was used as moccasin lining, pillow stuffing, and diaper material. As the country grew, cattails spread North and Eastward in the United States. Cattail is a member of the grass family, Gramineae, as are rice, corn, wheat, oats, barley, and rye, just to mention a few. Aids Birthing: prevents miscarriage and retained placenta. Baskets can be used to carry food and supplies with you as you travel throughout the wilderness looking for sanctuary. I was admiring a blanket of stars spread above Lake Como in Montana’s Bitterroot valley, when out of the stillness of the chill winter night came floating a deep, dignified, hoo-h’HOO-hoo-hoo. Native American’s harvested cattails regularly and utilized them for various things. Sometimes the margins on the Sweet Flag are red. Maybe – if you’re not like me – you already have a strong opinion about cattails. Once you reach the tough part of the stalk, don’t eat any further. Let’s enumerate some other survival uses right now: cattail can be used for making pillows, tinder, torches , fire, insulation, for fire transportation. As such, Cattails perform a filtering function in nature. Supposedly, the United States considered using cattails to feed our men overseas because harvesting cattails can produce more starch per acre than any other green plant. I know we discussed it briefly above, but when it comes to survival and emergency situations, cattail is not just good for medicinal purposes. These plants have uses far beyond just being edible. MEDICINAL AND OTHER USES. Cattail rhizomes are fairly high in starch content; this is usually listed at about 30% to 46%. By continuing to use the service, you agree to our use of cookies. Utilized worldwide, Cattail is one of the more significant food plants. The dried stalks can be used for hand drills and arrow shafts. Cattail (Typha spp.) As I found a spot for myself a red squirrel came bounding toward me on a fallen log. As scientists and naturalists we are interested not only in where birds go in the winter, but in how we know where birds go in search of more hospitable conditions. Cattail. Medical Indications: (Caution: The young shoots resemble poisonous iris shoots, so be absolutely sure of identification before you attempt ingesting this plant. Also commonly seen at Bancroft Pond are mallard ducks and Canada geese who eat the cattail roots. Cattail can promote menstrual bleeding. ​Internally, the pollen can treat urinary problems, angina, menstrual problems, abdominal pain, tapeworms, vomiting of blood, and internal bleeding. If you’re interested in finding out more about harvesting and preparing cattails, I found this great series of YouTube videos on it you should check out.​. The legendary Japanese sword Kusanagi got its name from the Calamus. ​Nearly every part of the cattail plant is edible. After all, it is an invasive plant that helps turn flowing water into marshland and – over time – into land. t truly could be lifesaving in the right situation, We use cookies for various purposes including analytics and personalized marketing. To treat burns, scrapes, insect bites and bruises split open a cattail root and “bruise” the exposed portion so it can be used as a poultice that can be secured over the injured area. By folding a few leaves from the cattail stalk, Chippewa made simple dolls and small toy ducks that really float. Also, the “down” of the mature flower spikes has been used as a dressing for burns and wounds. Medicinal use of Southern Cattail: The leaves are diuretic. The Cherokee used to make a mild tea from the twigs and black gum bark to relieve chest pains. Notes: Though flowers and shoots are edible for humans, Cattail may be poisonous to grazing animals. https://wildmedicines.blogspot.com/2012/11/cattail-typha.html Cattail (Typha spp.) Lastly, cattails can be turned into medicinal treatments for burns, insect bites, bruises, and scrapes. Wow! About Cattail Benefits Nutritional Facts of Cattail Cattail Health Benefits Cattail Uses Cattail Side Effects Cattail Cultivation The health benefits of Cattail are such that it provides natural antiseptic properties, helps in preventing Anaemia, provides skin care, helps in cancer prevention, provides steady increase in energy, has cardio tonic and lipid-lowering effects. However, careful stewardship of cattails within wetland areas might go a long way toward preserving the plant’s many benefits to the waterways and to the species that live and feed on them. The plants inhabit fresh to slightly brackish waters and are considered aquatic or semi-aquatic. I'd been sitting in a peaceful reverie for only a minute when suddenly a pine cone came crashing to the ground just a couple of feet away. arrow shafts, hand drills, hats, mats, cordage, baskets, bedding, shelters, syrup, bandages for wounds, burns, stings, cuts, bruises, and for mitigating toothaches.